About Us

The British Association for Canadian Studies Legal Studies Group (BACS/LSG) is a non-profit academic group which aims to promote education, learning and research, and the general dissemination of knowledge in the field of legal studies with a particular focus on Anglo-Canadian issues. In order to achieve these aims, part of our work involves organising regular scholarly international conferences with a comparative legal theme. We are one of a number of specialist groups belonging to the British Association of Canadian Studies, whose web page can be found at http://www.canadian-studies.net/ and have a representative on their Executive Council to maintain our wider academic and interdisciplinary links. For those looking for specific Canadian legal information, legal websites (including statutes and case reports) can be found through the Access Canada Web Portal, whose web page can be found at http://www.canadian-studies.net/accesscanada/


Previous conferences have included themes such as Human Rights, Gender and Sexuality, Intellectual Property, Health Policy and the Law, Tort, and Contract Law/Unjust Enrichment. These conferences have attracted much interest, and we have been honoured to have had prominent members of the Academy and Judiciary, both English and Canadian, in attendance. Past keynote speakers have included Madam Justice Rosalie Abella, Chief Justice McLachlin, Professor Brenda Cossman and Professor Martha Jackman. For reviews of recent conferences, please go to the publications page.
For details of forthcoming conferences, please go to our forthcoming conferences page.  For our constitution, please click on Constitution.
 

Executive Committee

The Executive Committee is made up of a small number of elected British and Canadian academics with an interest and expertise in British-Canadian law. The committee is the steering group for the legal studies organisation, and responsible for organising conferences, and ensuring the continuation of the group's aims. The current membership of the Committee for 2010-11 is outlined below.


Dr Keith Syrett (Chair)
Dr Keith Syrett is a Reader in Public Law and Health Policy at the University of Bristol. His research interests lie at the intersection of public law and health, especially with respect to judicial adjudication of questions of allocation of scarce resources, access to healthcare as a human right, and government interventions for public health purposes. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the British Association for Canadian Studies and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Ms Catharine MacMillan (Treasurer)
Catharine MacMillan practised law in the province of British Columbia before joining the Department of Law at Queen Mary, University of London where she is Reader in Law.  Her main research interests are in contract and commercial law, with an emphasis on the historical development of contract law. 

Mr Guy MacCrindle (Secretary)
Mr Guy MacCrindle is a Lecturer in Law, with teaching and research interests in Evidence, Torts and Human Rights.

Dr Charlotte Smith (Membership Secretary)
Charlotte Smith is a Senior Lecturer in law at the University of Reading. She teaches modules in English legal history and constitutional law. Her research interests include nineteenth century legal history, ecclesiastical law and law and religion. She is currently working on a project which explores the readjustment of relations between Church and State in nineteenth century England and the redefinition of the body spiritual.


Professor Jonathan Black-Branch
Professor Black-Branch is Professor of International Law at Royal Holloway, University of London and the University of Brighton.  He teaches in the area of international law focussing on both public and economic aspects, having published widely in these areas.


Professor Paula Giliker
Professor Paula Giliker is Professor of Comparative Law at the University of Bristol and President of the British Association of Comparative Law.  She specialises in the laws of contract and tort and, in particular, the relationship between common law and civil law systems and the significance of legal culture and heritage.